Skip to Content

The latest updates from the Marshall Project

Financial Times: The Marshall Project is the Future of News

Check out Gillian Tett’s Financial Times column about how The Marshall Project represents “the birth of a new media species.”

“I for one hope that Barsky’s venture flourishes – and not just because there is a burning need to start a more thoughtful conversation about the criminal justice system in the US,” Tett writes. “In a world increasingly ruled by celebrity soundbites, the sight of entrepreneurs trying to start national debates about complex, weighty matters is to be celebrated; not least because this was not something media doomsters might have expected a decade ago.”

Nicole Gordon Joins The Marshall Project as Executive Director

Nicole-Gordon-headshot-smallNicole Gordon, an attorney and the founding executive director of New York City’s Campaign Finance Board, has joined The Marshall Project as executive director, Neil Barsky, the project’s founder and publisher, announced Thursday. Gordon will manage The Marshall Project’s non-editorial functions, including development, strategy, human resources, compliance and finance.

The Marshall Project is edited by Bill Keller, former executive editor of The New York Times. It is a nonpartisan, not-for-profit news organization that will focus on the American criminal justice system, using both traditional and digital journalism tools to help spark a national conversation about America’s criminal justice system.

“Nicole Gordon brings the same level of professional excellence to The Marshall Project’s management as Bill Keller brings to editorial,” said Neil Barsky. “With our senior management team now in place, we are moving full speed ahead toward our launch later this year.”

Earlier, The Marshall Project announced the hiring of Gabriel Dance and Tim Golden as managing editors.

“I am excited to join The Marshall Project as it pursues its mission to shine a light on the criminal justice system through innovative, high-impact journalism,” Gordon said. “I care deeply about the subject matter and believe we can make a meaningful impact.”

Previously, as vice president of the JEHT Foundation, Gordon oversaw funding of a wide range of criminal justice projects, including evaluating promising reforms in prisoner re-entry policy across the country. She chaired the Accountability Task Force of the New York State Office of Public Safety and, most recently, assisted the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the New York City Department of Investigation on special projects.

Gordon is a graduate of Barnard College and Columbia Law School. She received the Outstanding Service Award of the Council on Governmental Ethics Laws, the Columbia Law School Lawrence A. Wien Prize for Social Responsibility and a Wasserstein Public Interest Fellowship at Harvard Law School. She produced “An Empire of Reason,” an Emmy-award winning documentary about the adoption of the U.S. Constitution.

The Marshall Project is a not-for-profit, non-partisan news organization dedicated to covering America’s criminal justice system. We will launch in the second half of 2014.

The Marshall Project is founded on two simple ideas:

1) There is a pressing national need for excellent journalism about the U.S. court and prison systems. The U.S. has the highest rate of incarceration in the world. From spiraling costs, to controversial drug laws, to prison violence, to concerns about systemic racial bias, there is a growing bipartisan consensus that America’s criminal justice system is in dire need of reform. As traditional media companies cut back on enterprise reporting, the Marshall Project will serve as a dynamic digital hub for information and debate on the legal and corrections systems.

2) With growing awareness of the system’s failings, now is an opportune moment to launch a national conversation about criminal justice. There are numerous indications of the country’s appetite for reform. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder recently proposed sweeping changes to mandatory sentencing guidelines for drug offenses. In New York State, the Rockefeller drug laws were amended to give judges more discretion over sentencing. Marijuana is now decriminalized or legal in 16 states. And for the first time in decades, the national prison population is beginning to decline.

We believe honest storytelling is a powerful agent of social change. The Marshall Project will be an agenda-setting resource for up-to-the-minute news, in-depth reporting and commentary about criminal justice. Our goal is to help make criminal justice reform an important part of the national debate by the 2016 presidential campaign. Just as a “national conversation” dramatically altered the country’s views on gay marriage and education reform, so too can a national conversation help us confront our troubled courts and prisons.

The Marshall Project will combine the best of the old and the new in journalism. We will achieve our goals through the use of conventional investigative reporting and opinion writing, and embrace new technologies currently transforming the media, including interactive graphics, immersive digital stories, short video documentaries and content generated by our readers. We will curate the daily torrent of criminal justice news from publications around the country, highlight the work of advocacy groups on both the right and left, host debates, and drive a lively discussion on social media.

Our name is an homage to Supreme Court justice and crusading civil rights attorney Thurgood Marshall.

The Marshall Project will be funded with the support of foundations and donors. For more information, contact us at info@themarshallproject.org.

Bill Keller, Editor-in-chief

Bill Keller
Bill Keller is The Marshall Project’s fist editor-in-chief.

Keller worked for The New York Times from 1984 to 2014 as a correspondent, editor and, most recently, as an Op-Ed columnist. From July 2003 until September 2011, he was the executive editor of The Times. During his eight years in that role, The Times sustained and built its newsgathering staff, winning 18 Pulitzer Prizes, and expanded its audience by adapting the newsroom to the journalistic potential of the Internet. The newsroom also participated in the creation of a digital subscription plan to help secure the company’s economic future.

Before becoming executive editor, Keller had spent two years as an Op-Ed columnist and senior writer for The New York Times Magazine. He served as managing editor from 1997 to 2001, and as foreign editor from 1995 to 1997.

As chief of The Times bureau in Johannesburg from April 1992 until May 1995, he covered the end of white rule in South Africa. From December 1986 to October 1991, Keller was a Times correspondent in Moscow, reporting on the easing and ultimate collapse of Communist rule and the breakup of the Soviet Union. In 1989, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage.

Before coming to The Times, Keller was a reporter for The Dallas Times Herald, the Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report in Washington and The Portland Oregonian.

Keller graduated from Pomona College with a B.A. degree in 1970 and is a member of the college’s board of trustees. He lives in New York with his wife, Emma Gilbey Keller, and their daughters, Molly and Alice.

Nicole Gordon, Executive Director

Nicole Gordon
Nicole Gordon is an attorney and public policy expert. She was the founding executive director of New York City’s pioneer Campaign Finance Board, which administers public financing for political campaigns and is considered a national and international model. As vice president of the JEHT Foundation, Gordon oversaw funding of a wide range of criminal justice projects, including evaluating promising reforms in prisoner re-entry policy across the country. She recently chaired the Accountability Task Force of the New York State Office of Public Safety, and has assisted the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the New York City Department of Investigation on special projects.

Gordon received the Outstanding Service Award from the Council on Governmental Ethics Laws, the Columbia Law School Lawrence A. Wien Prize for Social Responsibility and a Wasserstein Public Interest Fellowship at Harvard Law School. She produced “An Empire of Reason,” an Emmy-award winning documentary about the adoption of the U.S. Constitution.

She is a graduate of Barnard College and Columbia Law School. She was a law clerk to the Hon. Harold Medina of the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals and an associate at the law firm of Debevoise & Plimpton, where she worked on First Amendment cases. She was subsequently counsel to the chairman of the New York State Commission on Government Integrity (“The Feerick Commission”).

Tim Golden, Managing Editor for Investigations and News

Tim Golden
Tim Golden has worked as a journalist for nearly 30 years, primarily as an investigative reporter and foreign correspondent. His forthcoming book is about the history of America’s detention of terror suspects at Guantanamo Bay.

Golden was a senior writer at The New York Times and contributor to The New York Times Magazine. He has twice shared the Pulitzer Prize: in 1998 for International Reporting, for articles about the effects of drug corruption in Mexico, and in 1987 for National Reporting, for stories related to the Iran-contra affair. He has been a Schwartz senior fellow at the New America Foundation and received the 2010 MacArthur Residency at Yaddo.

Golden joined the Times in 1990 and reported from Mexico City and San Francisco before returning to New York in 1998 as an investigative reporter assigned to the foreign staff. In 2000, he joined the newspaper’s first investigative unit.

Previously, Golden was on the foreign staff of the Miami Herald, working from El Salvador and Brazil. He began his journalistic career as a foreign-affairs reporter in the Washington bureau of United Press International.

Gabriel Dance, Managing Editor for Digital

Gabriel Dance
Gabriel Dance is a journalist and editor working at the cutting edge of digital news. He began his career in 2006 at The New York Times, eventually serving as chief multimedia producer. After more than four years creating award-winning projects, Dance left the Times to help launch the iPad-only news source, The Daily, as art director for news.

Dance joined The Guardian as interactive editor in 2012. Based in New York City, he helped launch the Guardian US, building a graphics team that garnered awards and recognition for interactive storytelling. He was part of a group of journalists who won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for coverage of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency.

Dance’s work has also won an Emmy award, an Alfred L. DuPont award, a World Press Photo award, and several awards from the Online News Association, the Society for News Design, and Malofiej, the premier information graphics competition.

Dana Goldstein, Staff Writer

Dana Goldstein
Dana Goldstein is a journalist with deep expertise in public education, inequality, social science, and gender issues. Her book The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, will be published by Doubleday in September 2014.

At The Marshall Project, Goldstein will cover research on criminal justice and will report on the school-to-prison pipeline.

She has received a Schwartz fellowship from the New America Foundation, a Puffin fellowship from the Nation Institute, and a Spencer Fellowship from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. Previously, she was a writer and editor at The Daily Beast and The American Prospect. She contributes to Slate, The Atlantic, and other national magazines, and is a graduate of Brown University.

Neil Barsky, Founder and Publisher

Neil
Neil Barsky has enjoyed a distinguished career in the fields of journalism, finance and filmmaking. Neil co-founded the hedge fund Midtown Capital and founded Alson Capital Partners, which at its peak stood at $3.5 billion assets under management. After retiring from the investment business in 2009, Neil directed KOCH, the critically-acclaimed documentary film about New York City’s former mayor, which was released theatrically in 2013.

Previously, Neil was a reporter for the New York Daily News and The Wall Street Journal. While at the Journal, he won a Loeb Award for his coverage of the collapse of Donald Trump’s business empire. Neil also worked as an equity research analyst for Morgan Stanley. He was the #1 ranked lodging and gaming analyst in the 1997 Institutional Investor magazine poll.

Neil serves on the boards of Youth Communication and Oberlin College, from which he graduated. He taught economics at Oberlin in 2009. Neil is chairman of the board of overseers of the Columbia Journalism Review and is a graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

You can reach us at info@themarshallproject.org
Sign up for email updates here
and follow us on Twitter and Facebook

Mailing Address and Phone:
250 W. 57th Street, Suite 2514
New York, NY 10107
212 803 5200

Send us a message:

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message