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Maurice Chammah is a staff writer whose work has been published by The New Yorker, The Atlantic and The New York Times. He is currently at work on a book about the rise and fall of the death penalty, which won the 2019 J. Anthony Lukas Work-In-Progress Book Award. A former Fulbright fellow, he helps organize The Insider Prize, a contest for incarcerated writers sponsored by the magazine American Short Fiction. He lives in Austin, Texas.
Phone 212-803-5244
Twitter @MauriceChammah
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Feature July 1
When COVID-19 threatened the jail in Tyler, Texas, an activist pressured her sheriff to make change.
News June 8
The controversial version of the U.S. flag has been hailed as a sign of police solidarity and criticized as a symbol of white supremacy.
Coronavirus May 28
Some prison systems aren’t collecting race data. Others won’t disclose it. Experts say these are big mistakes.
Coronavirus May 18
Opposition to stay-at-home orders is the latest example of a history of powerful sheriffs, which stretches back to the end of slavery and the settling of the frontier.
Coronavirus May 2
Among the many incarcerated people who have died from COVID-19 was Marshall Project contributor Timothy Bazrowx, one of Texas' best chroniclers of prison life.
Coronavirus April 16
Some relatives can’t claim bodies or hold funerals amid COVID-19 restrictions.
Coronavirus April 3
The case of Patrick Jones, the first federal prisoner to die from COVID-19, epitomizes national debates about criminal justice reform.
Life Inside April 1
“I tell my husband to keep my son in another room, while I put my uniform in a trash bag and take a long shower.”
Coronavirus March 23
Colorado abolished capital punishment. But COVID-19 is pausing it everywhere else.
Life Inside March 12
"We asked ourselves: Do we want to change our conditions, or do we want to change our circumstances?"