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Maurice Chammah is a staff writer and the author of "Let the Lord Sort Them: The Rise and Fall of the Death Penalty," which won the 2019 J. Anthony Lukas Work-In-Progress Book Award. His work has been published by The New Yorker, The Atlantic and The New York Times. A former Fulbright fellow, he helps organize The Insider Prize, a contest for incarcerated writers sponsored by the magazine American Short Fiction. He lives in Austin, Texas.
Phone 212-803-5244
Twitter @MauriceChammah
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Death Sentences September 7
As a Texas man sues for his pastor to touch him during his execution, a guide to rights for the condemned.
Death Sentences July 16
The case of Rodney Reed — whose innocence claims were championed by the reality TV star — raises questions about celebrities’ role in the criminal justice system.
May 6
“I don’t understand trying to kill somebody who is already dying,” says the sister of Idaho death-row prisoner Gerald Pizzuto.
Death Sentences April 15
A growing number of conservative lawmakers want to overhaul capital punishment, or end it.
Death Sentences April 5
The men arrested in recent killings in Atlanta, Boulder, Colorado, and Orange, California, could face very different sentences if convicted.
The Frame March 15
On exhibit at MoMA PS1, “Marking Time: Art in the Age of Incarceration” is a rich exploration of how artists adapt to limited materials and endless time.
Death Sentences February 4
Raymond Riles has been on death row longer than anyone in America. He’s one of many who have languished there for decades with severe mental illnesses.
Looking Back January 26
In an excerpt from his new book, ‘Let the Lord Sort Them,’ Marshall Project staff writer Maurice Chammah explains where a 1970s legal team fighting the death penalty went wrong.
Death Sentences January 14
Feds spent millions to restart the death penalty and in the process revealed much about how they do it.
Death Sentences January 8
Mental illness, childhood abuse and brain injuries affect a large share of those who face the death penalty.