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Maurice Chammah is a staff writer and the author of "Let the Lord Sort Them: The Rise and Fall of the Death Penalty," which won the 2019 J. Anthony Lukas Work-In-Progress Book Award. His work has been published by The New Yorker, The Atlantic and The New York Times. A former Fulbright fellow, he helps organize The Insider Prize, a contest for incarcerated writers sponsored by the magazine American Short Fiction. He lives in Austin, Texas.
Phone 212-803-5244
Twitter @MauriceChammah
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News November 8
Joe Biden ran on the most progressive criminal justice platform of any major party candidate in generations. So what can he actually do?
Feature October 15
A series on the damage police dogs inflict on Americans, published in collaboration with AL.com, IndyStar and the Invisible Institute.
Feature October 15
Growing up, few Black families in Ayanna Brooks’s neighborhood had dogs. A vicious attack reminded her why.
Feature September 19
Will demands for law enforcement accountability reach popular tough-on-crime sheriffs? A Florida race offers a test.
Feature July 29
But you probably wouldn’t know it, because sheriffs rule them with little accountability. After one man's death in a notorious lockup, residents of a Missouri town fought back.
Feature July 24
An oral history of the first federal execution under Donald Trump, as told by victims’ relatives, prison staff, and others.
Feature July 1
When COVID-19 threatened the jail in Tyler, Texas, an activist pressured her sheriff to make change.
News June 8
The controversial version of the U.S. flag has been hailed as a sign of police solidarity and criticized as a symbol of white supremacy.
Coronavirus May 28
Some prison systems aren’t collecting race data. Others won’t disclose it. Experts say these are big mistakes.
Coronavirus May 18
Opposition to stay-at-home orders is the latest example of a history of powerful sheriffs, which stretches back to the end of slavery and the settling of the frontier.