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Topeka Sam.
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Topeka K. Sam joins The Marshall Project’s Board of Directors

Sam is the first formerly incarcerated woman to join the board.

Topeka K. Sam, founder and executive director of The Ladies of Hope Ministries, is joining the Board of Directors of The Marshall Project. She is also the co-founder of Hope House NYC—a safe housing space for women and girls—and a founding member of The National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls.

“I am honored and humbled to join The Marshall Project Board of Directors,” said Sam. “The journalism produced by The Marshall Project helps to expose the deep injustices inside the carceral state and highlights the urgent need for criminal justice reform. By publishing voices from inside and outside the system, The Marshall Project has helped to broaden the struggle for justice and fairness. In bringing me onto the Board of Directors as the first formerly incarcerated African-American woman, The Marshall Project is enacting its commitment not only to diversity but to inclusion of a voice that is not heard enough: one directly impacted by prison. I look forward to the work ahead.”

“The Marshall Project is thrilled that Topeka Sam is joining our board of directors,” said Carroll Bogert, president of The Marshall Project. “She will bring a powerful life experience and unique voice to our conversations, and her network among criminal justice reformers is wide and deep. We're honored that she will share those talents with our board.”

In addition to serving on the board of The Marshall Project and Grassroots Leadership, Sam is a Beyond the Bars 2015 Fellow and a 2016 Justice-In-Education Scholar, both from Columbia University; a 2017 Soros Justice Advocacy Fellow working on probation and parole accountability; a 2018 Unlocked Futures Inaugural Cohort Member; a 2018 Opportunity Agenda Communications Institute Fellow; director of #Dignity Campaign for #cut50; and Host of “The Topeka K. Sam Show” on SiriusXM UrbanView.

Since her release from federal prison in May 2015, Sam has worked tirelessly for criminal justice reform, and her initiatives have been covered by Vogue, SalonTV, Vice, and the New York Times. Most recently she has been featured in Glamour Magazine and Black Enterprise for being “the black woman behind the video that led to the Trump clemency of Alice Johnson.”

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The Marshall Project produces journalism that makes an impact. Our investigation into violence using police dogs prompted departments from Indiana to Louisiana to change their policies. Thousands of cameras were installed in the infamous Attica prison after we revealed the extent of violent abuse by guards. Municipalities stopped charging parents for their kids’ incarceration because of our reporting. Supreme Court justices have cited us, along with incarcerated people acting as their own lawyers.

The type of reporting we practice takes persistence, skill and, above all, time, which is why we need your support. Thanks to generous readers like you, The Marshall Project has already raised nearly $25,000 of our $100,000 goal during our year-end campaign. The funds we raise now are going to be essential to sustaining this important work. We’ve still got a long way to go to reach our goal, though.

To help us get there, a generous group of donors will be matching all new donations. They’ve pledged $100,000 in matching funds and are matching donations dollar-for-dollar until our December 31 deadline. Will you join The Marshall Project today and double the impact of your donation?

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