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Submitted 9:45 a.m.
02.24.2015
Letter to the Editor

It is a somewhat vicious cycle as these are the least likely folks to get hired in a tight economy and then they go back to jail for court debt owed. ”

Adele Bruch-Appel of Media, PA

My son is currently incarcerated at local county (for profit) prison in Delaware County, PA. He was told that once he is out on parole/probation that if he didn't pay his court fines in a timely fashion that this was a violation and he could be incarerated due to non-payment. This would be true even if he was unemployed. Several other prisoners who were on his block are there for non-payment of their court fines and fees.

It is a somewhat vicious cycle as these are the least likely folks to get hired in a tight economy and then they go back to jail for court debt owed. And then when they get out again it is even harder for them to get work - plus they owe even more money. Dickensonian to say the least.

Thanks for your good work.

 
These letters written in response to
News February 24, 2015
Congress outlawed them. The Supreme Court ruled them unconstitutional. Yet they live on.