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Eli Hager is a staff writer covering juvenile justice, family court, fines and fees and other issues. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Guardian, This American Life and elsewhere. He also works on The Marshall Project's "Life Inside" feature and is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Columbia University. In 2017, Eli was named a Livingston Award finalist for his investigation into private prisoner transportation.
Phone 212-803-5211
Twitter @elibhager
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Feature May 17
The majority of states obtain money intended for foster children with disabilities or a deceased parent without telling them, The Marshall Project and NPR found.
Feature April 22
State foster care agencies have been taking benefits that belong to some of the most vulnerable kids. Here’s what to ask to see if it’s happened to you — and how to ask for your money back.
Coronavirus April 14
During the pandemic, video chats replaced in-person visits between parents and their children placed in foster care. The effects could linger for years.
Thousands of kids were freed from juvenile detention during the pandemic. They were more likely to be White, data shows.
Looking Back January 26
Some experts hope Eric Lander, the president’s choice for new science adviser, will crack down on bad forensics in courtrooms.
Analysis January 19
Donald Trump’s volatile approach to granting clemency epitomizes a system that many have long hoped to change.
Analysis January 14
Amid calls for tougher laws after the Capitol assault, research shows that measures addressing White violence usually fall harder on Black people.
News January 8
But local cops can still receive Pentagon equipment, including automatic rifles.
The Lowdown January 8
Everyone's talking about sedition, treason and conspiracy. Here's what these terms actually mean and how they've been enforced.
News December 17, 2020
His administration has funneled $30 million to Ashland University in Ohio. Critics say the school’s tablet-based program fails incarcerated students.